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00177   Dr J Leake  University of Sheffield
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Please note: This research Programme is no longer active


 

Title of Research Project
Carbon flow through mycorrhizal mycelial systems to soil microbial populations - the impact of microarthropod diversity

Research workers:

PI

Dr Jonathan Leake Animal & Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Alfred Denny Building, Sheffield S10 2TN j.r.leake@sheffield.ac.uk

Co-PI

Prof Elizabeth Wellington Biological Sciences, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL ewellington@bio.warwick.ac.uk

Co-PI

Prof David Read Animal & Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Alfred Denny Building, Sheffield S10 2TN d.j.read@sheffield.ac.uk

Co-PI

Dr Paul Quick Animal & Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Alfred Denny Building, Sheffield S10 2TN w.quick@sheffield.ac.uk

Co-PI

Dr Richard Bardgett Biological Sciences Institute of Envirtonmental & Natural Sciences, University of Lancaster, LA1 4YQ r.bardgett@lancaster.ac.uk
PDRA Dr Dave Johnson University of Sheffield d.johnson@sheffield.ac.uk
PDRA Dr M Krsek University of Warwick m.krsek@bio.warwick.ac.uk

Abstract
We hypothesise that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) mycelium in upland grassland provides a major, rapid and distinct, pathway for the flux of plant-derived C into soil and supports specialized populations of soil micro-organisms. Novel soil-core systems controlling the presence and absence of AM mycelia and microarthropods will be used to quantify C flux fro plants through Am to soil bacteria and microarthropods by 14C and 13C labelling of turfs and in the field. AM-associated bacteria will be identified by 16/18S rDNA and DGGE. Effects of microarthropod diversity on disruption to C flux through AM mycelia will be quantified. The project will redress a serious deficiency in rhizosphere C flux models, none of which include effects on AM.