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2130 Prof BJ Finlay CEHWindermere, Cumbria
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Please note: This research Programme is no longer active


 

Title of Research Project
Soil protozoan diversity and its role in carbon and nitrogen turnover.

Research workers:

PI

Prof BJ Finlay

CEH Windermere

b.finlay@ceh.ac.uk

PI

Prof K Vickerman

University of Glasgow

k.vickerman@bio.gla.ac.uk

Collaborator

Dr HIJ Black

CEH Lancaster

HIJB@ceh.ac.uk

PDRA

Dr G F Esteban

CEH Windermere

GENT@ceh.ac.uk

PDRA

Dr J L Olmo

CEH Windermere

JLO@ceh.ac.uk

HSO

Dr S Brown

CEH Windermere

SB@ceh.ac.uk

SSO

Ken Clarke

CEH Windermere

KC@ceh.ac.uk

G7

Dr S C Maberly

CEH Windermere

SCM@ceh.ac.uk

SSO

Dr G H Hall

CEH Windermere

GHH@ceh.ac.uk

SO (Tech)

Ruth Hindle

CEH Windermere

RMHI@ceh.ac.uk

Abstract

Protozoa are the most abundant group of phagotrophs in soil, and grazing by protozoa may, indirectly, stimulate the rate of organic matter decomposition in soil. The principal objective of this work is to obtain a comprehensive characterisation of the natural history of the free-living protozoa in Sourhope soils.

We aim to address three questions:

  1. by what mechanism(s) do protozoa stimulate the decomposition rate, and can it be quantified?
  2. what is the relative importance of protozoan abundance, and protozoan species richness (i.e. is ‘biodiversity’ important?)
  3. is the role of protozoa affected by land management practices?

We will also test the hypothesis that soil protozoan species are cosmopolitan, in which case our conclusions may have relevance on a global scale.

 

Links

University of Glasgow

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